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Dementia and Neurofeedback

Across the world today, there are 47.5 million people struggling with dementia, or the decline of mental ability so severe it affects a person’s day-to-day life. The term describes a range of symptoms from decline in memory to reduced brain function, which affects a person’s ability to perform regular activities. Damage in the brain’s nerve cells causes dementia, with many parts of the brain being prone to this type of damage. The symptoms are dependent on which part of the brain is affected.

Migraines and Neurofeedback

In the US, about 30 million cases of migraines are reported each year. Migraines are persistent, pulsing headaches that come with several other difficult symptoms making daily functioning come to a halt. Anyone who has ever experienced a migraine can tell you how intensely painful they can be and how difficult they are to treat. The pain of a migraine typically worsens with exertion. Those suffering often are confined to a quiet, dark room until the pain lets up. Migraines are caused by blood vessels that become enlarged in addition to the release of chemicals from nerve fibers surrounding these vessels.

High-Functioning Autism

April is Autism Awareness Month, a time dedicated to raising awareness of autistic spectrum disorders in a continued effort to improve the quality of life for those struggling. Nationally, a puzzle piece is known to be a symbol for autism awareness because each puzzle piece is different, representing the diversity of the individuals affected, just as each individual case of autism is unique. The reason for classifying autism within the autistic spectrum is because every individual may have a variety of symptoms while simultaneously lacking other symptoms that are commonly associated with autism. In fact, sometimes autism can be difficult to fully identify for this reason.

In 2013, new diagnostic criteria were developed to identify autism within three levels of support. However, there are no particular criteria that would automatically assign someone to a level as each case varies greatly. The term “high-functioning autism” refers to a person who may have mild symptoms of autism that are significant enough to warrant a diagnosis, yet who’s symptoms do not completely align with classic autism. This makes pinning down a diagnosis difficult at times. The diagnosis of Level 1 Autism Spectrum Disorder refers to those who are functional yet exhibit symptoms of autism.

Bulimia and Neurofeedback

In the United States today, eating disorders have become more and more prevalent, affecting about 20 million women and 10 million men. One of the most commonly seen eating disorders is bulimia, characterized by frequent episodes of consuming large amounts of food followed by behaviors to prohibit weight gain, including vomiting and the use of laxatives. During episodes of binge eating, suffers often report feeling a loss of control. Although men do also suffer from bulimia, women are more commonly diagnosed, accounting for 80% of cases. Up to 4% of women will have bulimia in their lifetime that is considered clinically significant, and 3.9% will die from the disorder.

Lyme Disease Prevention

9 Steps to Prevent Tick Bites

Summer is here, and people are beginning to spend more time outdoors, enjoying the warmth and sunshine. However, Lyme disease has been consistently on the rise for several years. According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Lyme disease to be affecting up to 300,000 people each year with the majority of the cases occurring in the Northeast. In fact, about 50,000 of these cases come from the state of Massachusetts alone. These worrying statistics make Lyme prevention and precautions necessary for everyone to know and utilize.

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